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Lake Texoma Fish Species2018-12-17T14:56:06+00:00

Lake Texoma Fish Species

Lake Texoma is an 89,000 acre border lake between Texas and Oklahoma. Texoma is known renowned for it’s striped bass and is a popular attraction here in the Southwest. Lake Texoma is one of the largest reservoirs in the United States completed in 1944. Lake Texoma fish species span a variety of freshwater fish; such as striped bass, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, channel and blue cats, black and white crappie and various other freshwater fish.

Striped Bass Lake Texoma

STRIPED BASS

Striped bass are the most popular Lake Texoma Fish Species and are of significant value for sport fishing, and have been introduced to many waterways outside their natural range. A variety of angling methods are used, including trolling and casting with topwater lures early morning and late evening, as well as bait casting with live and dead bait. The largest Striped Bass caught on a rod and reel on Lake Texoma was 35.12 pounds caught in 1984.

STRIPED BASS (Morone saxatilis)

Striped bass are the fourth most preferred species among licensed Texas anglers. It is estimated that the economic impact of striper fishing in the Lake Texoma area alone totals well in excess of $20 million. Stripers are often captured using artificial lures that imitate small fish, such as silver spoons. Deep running lures can also be effective, as may live bait, or cut bait. In Texas, stripers in excess of 50 pounds have been landed. Although specimens exceeding 100 pounds have been caught in saltwater, to date a 67.5-pounder was the largest individual reported from inland waters.

THE STRIPED BASS

The striped bass is the largest member of the sea bass family, often called “temperate” or “true” bass to distinguish it from species such as largemouth, smallmouth, and spotted bass which are actually members of the sunfish family Centrarchidae. Although Morone is of unknown derivation, saxatilis is Latin meaning “dwelling among rocks.” As with other true basses, the dorsal fin is clearly separated into spiny and soft-rayed portions. Striped bass are silvery, shading to olive-green on the back and white on the belly, with seven or eight uninterrupted horizontal stripes on each side of the body. Younger fish may resemble white bass.striped bass have two distinct tooth patches on the back of the tongue, whereas white bass have one tooth patch. Striped bass have two sharp points on each gill cover, and white bass have one.

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STRIPED BASS HISTORY

  • Striped bass can live in both freshwater and saltwater environments.

  • Can travel 100 miles inland to spawn.

  • Spawning begins in the spring when water temperatures approach 60°F.

  • Stripers may reach a size of 10 to 12 inches during the first year.

  • Adult striper predominantly feed on members of the herring family such as gizzard shad and threadfin shad.

  • Alewife and glut herring are often found in their stomachs in the northern states.

  • The striped bass is native to a variety of habitats including shores, bays, and estuaries.

Lake Texoma Striper Fishing Guide

STRIPED BASS DISTRIBUTION

striped bass are a coastal species that moves far upstream during spawning migrations in coastal rivers. The striped bass’ native range is along the Atlantic coast east of the Appalachian Mountains from New Brunswick south to Florida and west into Louisiana. The species has been introduced at scattered locations throughout the central US. There have also been introductions as far west as the Colorado River in Arizona, and at various sites in California. Even though the striped bass isn’t native to Texas, the species has been stocked in a number of reservoirs, Lake Texoma being the biggest.

SAND BASS

White bass are silvery shading from dark-gray or black on the back to white on the belly. Several incomplete lines or stripes run horizontally on each side of the body. Adult white bass resemble young striped bass, and the two are often confused. Lake Texoma offers ample opportunity at white bass, thanks to the Washita and Red Rivers. The Lake Texoma white bass record is 3.41 pounds and 18.00 inches in length, caught in 1994.

Sand Bass Lake Texoma

THE WHITE BASS

White Bass as with other true basses, the dorsal fin is clearly double, separated into spiny and soft-rayed portions. White bass are silvery shading from dark-gray or black on the back to white on the belly. Several incomplete lines or stripes run horizontally on each side of the body. Adult white bass resemble young striped bass, and the two are often confused. Striped bass have two distinct tooth patches on the back of the tongue, and white bass have one tooth patch. Striped bass have two sharp points on each gill cover that white bass do not.

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WHTIE BASS HISTORY

  • White bass are active early spring spawners.

  • Males migrate upstream to spawning areas as much as a month before females.

  • Large females sometimes release nearly a million small eggs during the spawning season.

  • Eggs hatch in about 2-3 days.

  • White bass feed near the surface where fish, crustaceans, and emerging insects are found in abundance.

  • Gizzard and threadfin shad are the preferred food items.

  • White bass more than four years of age are rare.

Lake Texoma Striper Fishing Guide

For more information about Striper Charter Trips, follow Lake Texoma Fishing Guide Marty Zamora

WHTIE BASS DISTRIBUTION

White bass are native to the the central US west of the Appalachians, including the Great Lakes, as well as river systems in the Ohio and Mississippi river valleys. In Texas the species is native to the Red River drainage.

LAKE TEXOMA WHITE BASS

White bass are the 5th most preferred species among licensed Texas anglers. White bass feed on shad generate much excitement in the fishing community. Once a school has been located, successful anglers often fish the surface with spoons or spinners. Bottom fishing at night with live bait may also produce great success. White bass are excellent fighters, and are considered superb table fare.

Smallmouth Bass Lake Texoma

SMALLMOUTH BASS

Smallmouth bass, also known as “smallies” are favored by some bass fisherman over largemouth. While the smallmouth bass in Texas aren’t the same size as they are in the northern parts of the country, these bass are often a preferred species of fish when it comes to angling on Lake Texoma. Smallmouth bass are known to feed on minnows, crayfish, and alderfly larvae, which are among the most successful live baits used. The Lake Texoma record smallmouth bass is 7.06 pounds and 22.75 long.  Lake Texoma is a great smallmouth fishery and often overlooked!  Catching smallmouth on our Striper Fishing Charters is not uncommon!

Lake Texoma Crappie

WHITE & BLACK CRAPPIE

Lake Texoma offers ample opportunities to catch both white and black crappie. Black crappie predominate in Texas acidic waters of the east and northeast. Black crappie over 3.5 pounds and almost 4.5 pounds have been caught from both Texas public waters and private waters. During the spring months of late March well into April, crappie fishing is at it’s best due to the Spawn. The Lake Texoma crappie record is a White Crappie that weighed in at 3.23 pounds and 15.50 inches in length.

BLUE & CHANNEL CATFISH

One of the most popular of Lake Texoma fish species is both the blue and channel catfish. The blue catfish is the largest freshwater sportfish in Texas. Where mature populations exist, 50-pounders are not unusual. Typically, the largest fish are caught by trotliners, some of whom have landed specimens in excess of 115 pounds. Rod-and-reel anglers have landed specimens in excess of 80 pounds. The Lake Texoma catfish record is a 121.50 pound blue cat that came in at 58.00 in length caught in 2004.

Catfish Lake Texoma

LARGEMOUTH BASS

The second most sought after Lake Texoma fish species is the laregmouth bass. Two subspecies of largemouth bass exist in Texas: the native Micropterus salmoides salmoides and the Florida largemouth bass. These subspecies are visually indistinguishable, although they may be distinguished by genetic testing procedures. Both are usually green with dark blotches that form a horizontal stripe along the middle of the fish on either side. The underside ranges in color from light green to almost white. The Lake Texoma largemouth bass record is 11.90 pounds and is 25.50 inches long.

Largemouth Bass Lake Texoma